Adult & Childhood Hip Preservation

Avascular Necrosis of the Hip

Avascular Necrosis of the Hip

Avascular necrosis (AVN) or Aseptic Necrosis of the hip is caused by a disruption to the hip’s blood supply which results in the deterioration and often collapse of the ball of the thigh bone (femoral head). Early identification and treatment of the condition increases the likelihood that a patient’s hip will recover. Surgery may be required in severe cases to restore circulation to the hip or to replace the hip in end stage cases.

Legg-Calve-Perthes Disease

Legg-Calve-Perthes disease is a term used to describe avascular necrosis of the hip in children under the age of 10. The condition occurs when a disruption to the hip’s blood supply causes the bone of the femoral head to die and in some cases collapse. Early stage and mild cases of Perthes disease are often treated with a combination of non-surgical methods while surgery is usually reserved for more severe cases and older children.

Hip Dysplasia

Adult Hip Dysplasia

Adult hip dysplasia describes a condition where the hip’s ball (femoral head) and socket (acetabulum) are misaligned. The condition is common in children but is also found in adolescents and adults who have had no history of problems in childhood. Treatment options include temporizing with medication and/or physical therapy but surgery is often required to fix the problem. `

Childhood Hip Dysplasia

Childhood hip dysplasia describes a condition where the hip’s ball (femoral head) is dislocated from the socket (acetabulum). Treatment options include bracing, casting, and surgery but the exact course of treatment is dependent on the patient’s age and the severity of their condition.